Indoislamica

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Mohenjo-Daro and the Indus Civilization

Marshall, Sir John (editor)

Mohenjo-Daro and the Indus Civilization Mohenjo-Daro and the Indus Civilization Mohenjo-Daro and the Indus Civilization

Volume I: Text, 14 collotype and other plates (some folding). 2 large coloured folding maps in pocket, one a map of Baluchistan, Sind and Sistan, the second a site plan of Mohenjo-Daro. pp. xxvii, 364.

Volume II: Text, Appendices and Index. 31 line drawings. pp. xiii, (365)-716.

Volume III: 140 collotype plates (15 folding). pp. xi, plus plates. 3 volumes, original pictorial buckram, gilt. Bookplate of L.K. Elmhirst and stamps of Dartington Hall Library. A very good, clean, tight set of this uncommon work. Large 4 to.

Three volumes, original pictorial buckram, gilt. Bookplate of L.K. Elmhirst and stamps of Dartington Hall Library. A very good, clean, tight set of this uncommon work. Large 4to. Published 1931

The original and definitive documentation of one of the greatest archaeological discoveries of the twentieth century. The Indus Valley civilisation of Mohenjo-Daro and Harappa flourished around 3500 BC in what is now Pakistan. Sir John Marshall was Director-General of the Archaeological Survey of India from 1902 to 1928. One of his most distinguished successors, Sir Mortimer Wheeler, published the best-known popular account of this great civilisation under the title 5000 Years of Pakistan.

The Indian connection: Leonard and Dorothy Elmhirst at Dartington Hall


Leonard Elmhirst and his wealthy American wife, Dorothy (previously Whitney Straight) were philanthropists with a particular interest in new theories on agricultural development. In 1922, as a result of their friendship and admiration for the poet and educationalist, Rabindranath Tagore, they funded a research institute for 'rural reconstruction' near Santiniketan in West Bengal. With the proceeds from his Nobel Prize for Literature, Tagore had previously established a college in Santiniketan itself, based on his progressive educational theories.

Later, in 1925, the Dartington Hall Estate in Britain's West Country was purchased by the Elmhirsts. Their goal was to pioneer new ideas for farming, forestry and education, many inspired by Tagore. This was in the economically depressed environment following the First World War. Subsequently, Tagore paid several visits to his friends at Dartington.

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